Screening of KAPITAL and discussion with Isaac Julien and Mark Nash 7-9pm Thurs 25th Feb 2016

Final CIDRAL event on Finance and the Market!

Presented by CIDRAL and The Whitworth Art Gallery, the University of Manchester, a single-screen version of Isaac Julien’s installation KAPITAL will be shown on Thursday 25th Feb 2016 at The Whitworth 7-9pm. The screening will be followed by a discussion with Isaac Julien and Mark Nash (Royal College of Art), chaired by Jackie Stacey (University of Manchester). This event is free and no tickets are needed, but arrive early to avoid disappointment.

KAPITAL is a two-screen work centering around a conversation at the Hayward Gallery, London between Isaac Julien and renowned Marxist academic David Harvey (author of the book “The Enigma of Capital”). Julien opens the film by asking why capital is so difficult to depict, to which Harvey deftly replies: “in the same way you can only really intuit gravity exists by its effects, you can really only intuit that capital exists by its effects.” Staged as part of a seminar entitled Choreographing Capital organised by the artist at the Hayward Gallery in 2012, the event saw notable interventions from theorists, critics and curators such as the late Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Irit Rogoff and Colin MacCabe. Julien has always made work in collaboration, conversation and exchange but this is the first time he has opened up the complex and rigorous research processes that lie behind his working methods.

Isaac Julien was born in 1960 in London, where he currently lives and works. While studying painting and fine art film at St Martin’s School of Art from which he graduated in 1984, Isaac Julien co-founded ‘Sankofa Film and Video Collective’ in which he was active from 1983–1992. He was also a founding member of Normal Films in 1991.

Julien was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2001 for his films The Long Road to Mazatlán (1999), made in collaboration with Javier de Frutos and Vagabondia (2000), choreographed by Javier de Frutos. Earlier works include Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996), Young Soul Rebels (1991) which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival the same year, and the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), which also won several international awards.

Isaac Julien was visiting lecturer at Harvard University’s Schools of Afro-American and Visual Environmental Studies between 1998 and 2002. He was also a research fellow at Goldsmiths College, University of London (2000-2005), and is currently both faculty member at the Whitney Museum of American Arts and Professor of Media Art at Staatliche Hoscschule fur Gestaltung Karlsruhe, Germany. He was the recipient of the Performa Award (2008), the prestigious MIT Eugene McDermott Award in the Arts (2001) and the Frameline Lifetime Achievement Award (2002). His work Paradise Omeros was presented as part of Documenta XI in Kassel (2002). In 2003 he won the Grand Jury Prize at the Kunstfilm Biennale in Cologne for his single screen version of Baltimore; in 2008, he received a Special Teddy for his film that he collaborated on with Tilda Swinton, on Derek Jarman, called Derek, at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Julien has had solo shows at the Pompidou Centre in Paris (2005), MOCA Miami (2005), Kestnergesellschaft, Hanover (2006), the Museu Nacional de Arte Contemporânea – Museu do Chiado, Lisbon, Portugal (2009), Museum Brandhorst, Munich (2011) and most recently at SESC Pompeia in Brazil (2012). His film Ten Thousand Waves (2010) went on world tour, and has been on display in over 15 countries so far, and which will conclude at the Museum of Modern Art, New York in 2013/14. Julien is represented in both public and private collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern; Centre Pompidou; Guggenheim Collection; Hirshhorn Collection, Albright-Knox; the Irish Museum of Modern Art; the National Museum of Norway; Brandhorst Collection; Fundación Helga de Alvear, Madrid; Goetz Collection; the Louis Vuitton Art Foundation; LUMA Foundation; and the Zeitz Foundation.

Mark Nash is an independent curator and writer, until recently Professor and Head of Department, Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art London. He collaborated with Okwui Enwezor on the Arena Programme for the 2015 Venice BiennaleThe Short Century exhibition and Documenta11, both 2002 and Ute Meta Bauer on the 3rd Berlin Biennial 2004. He has written extensively on artists’ work with the moving image – both in his Experiments with Truth (Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philaelphia 2004-5 and his One Sixth of the Earth, ecologies of image at ZKM, Karlsruhe and MUSAC, León. This latter exhibition focused on the artistic legacy of the formerly socialist countries, previously explored in Reimagining October at Calvert 22 2009 (curated with Isaac Julien). Most recently, Mark Nash was also co-director with Isaac Julien of a series of live readings of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital as part of the 56th edition of La Bienniale di Venezia in 2015 and is currently curating Things Fall Apart, opening at Calvert 22 in February 2016. The show gathers the responses of contemporary artists to different aspects of Soviet and related nations’ interests in Africa, particularly focused on ambitions to influence the development of political structures through film and art.

Mark Nash was previously Director of the Fine Art Research Centre at Central St Martins, University of Arts, London. He holds a PhD from Middlesex University. He is currently working on two exhibitions: Things Fall Apart for Calvert22, London and Iwalewa House, Bayreuth in 2016 and The Shadow Never Lies (with Joshua Jiang) for Minsheng2, Shanghai in 2016. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the Nanyang Technological University and Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore as well as a visiting lecturer on the Film Curating MA at Birkbeck University of London, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s